Interior Painting Professional Tips

Painting an interior view provides an intimate look into another life, another environment, another time. I suggest actually– do not you enjoy seeing the light in your neighbors’ windows as you own by in the evening? Light through a window: there’s a warm sociability there.

Typically, interior paintings are part of a subset known as “category” paintings to distinguish them from pictures, landscape, still life and historic or spiritual styles.

Genre describes scenes of daily life instead of grand imagery. The warm intimate paintings of domestic vignettes by Dutch artists Johannes Vermeer or Jan Steen and the moody, spare interiors of Danish artists Vilhelm Hammershøi and Carl Vilhelm Holsøe are outstanding examples

WHEN PREPARING AND DEVELOPING YOUR INTERIOR, CONSIDER A FEW OF THESE STRATEGIES AND TIPS:

DEVELOPING CONTRAST

Just like all paintings, the area of greatest contrast is where the viewer’s eye is drawn. It might be produced where light streams through a window. Or where a reflection brightens a dark area. Positioning a high contrast area is important to creating a balanced painting. Think about the Rule of Thirds when designing your composition.

UTILIZING A VIEW FINDER

One way to test your structure is by checking out a view finder. You can purchase a small, adjustable plastic window to visually frame your scene. Or merely take pictures on your phone and test-crop them to determine the most well balanced and compelling view. Interiors require time to paint, so don’t shortchange this important action.

GETTING IDEAL POSITIONING

When you get going, make certain that real horizontals align with the horizon. In other words, the leading edges of any furnishings, shelves, etc., that you see straight on will be parallel with one another and exactly horizontal. Measure from the top edge of your canvas to check.

For verticals, measure from the side of the canvas to guarantee that they align. You can likewise make a “plumb line” (string with a weight connected to it). Hold completion of the string and let the weight hang. This produces a true vertical that you can align aesthetically in front of your scene and compare to your work.

With interior painting it is very important to examine perspective frequently– it can get lost while attention is drawn to patterns and texture.

AND AS YOU PAINT, KEEP THESE SUGGESTIONS IN MIND:
As you work, remember the reason you’ve selected the scene. Possibly it’s the opulent items or merely a tranquil state of mind. Whether it’s a palatial dining-room, busy café or abandoned building with bare walls, you can find rich interest.

Avoid painting big locations flat and monochromatic, as if you were painting real walls! Even empty walls will be intriguing if you mix subtle broken color into your brushstrokes. Take a look at work the Danish painters who fill their sporadic interiors with peace … or foreboding!